Natasa Milic-Frayling


2020

pdf bib
Approximation of Response Knowledge Retrieval in Knowledge-grounded Dialogue Generation
Wen Zheng | Natasa Milic-Frayling | Ke Zhou
Findings of the Association for Computational Linguistics: EMNLP 2020

This paper is concerned with improving dialogue generation models through injection of knowledge, e.g., content relevant to the post that can increase the quality of responses. Past research extends the training of the generative models by incorporating statistical properties of posts, responses and related knowledge, without explicitly assessing the knowledge quality. In our work, we demonstrate the importance of knowledge relevance and adopt a two-phase approach. We first apply a novel method, Transformer & Post based Posterior Approximation (TPPA) to select knowledge, and then use the Transformer with Expanded Decoder (TED) model to generate responses from both the post and the knowledge. TPPA method processes posts, post related knowledge, and response related knowledge at both word and sentence level. Our experiments with the TED generative model demonstrate the effectiveness of TPPA as it outperforms a set of strong baseline models. Our TPPA method is extendable and supports further optimization of knowledge retrieval and injection.

2017

pdf bib
Predicting News Values from Headline Text and Emotions
Maria Pia di Buono | Jan Šnajder | Bojana Dalbelo Bašić | Goran Glavaš | Martin Tutek | Natasa Milic-Frayling
Proceedings of the 2017 EMNLP Workshop: Natural Language Processing meets Journalism

We present a preliminary study on predicting news values from headline text and emotions. We perform a multivariate analysis on a dataset manually annotated with news values and emotions, discovering interesting correlations among them. We then train two competitive machine learning models – an SVM and a CNN – to predict news values from headline text and emotions as features. We find that, while both models yield a satisfactory performance, some news values are more difficult to detect than others, while some profit more from including emotion information.

2006

pdf bib
Proceedings of the Human Language Technology Conference of the NAACL, Companion Volume: Demonstrations
Alex Rudnicky | John Dowding | Natasa Milic-Frayling
Proceedings of the Human Language Technology Conference of the NAACL, Companion Volume: Demonstrations