Mor Geva


2020

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Injecting Numerical Reasoning Skills into Language Models
Mor Geva | Ankit Gupta | Jonathan Berant
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Large pre-trained language models (LMs) are known to encode substantial amounts of linguistic information. However, high-level reasoning skills, such as numerical reasoning, are difficult to learn from a language-modeling objective only. Consequently, existing models for numerical reasoning have used specialized architectures with limited flexibility. In this work, we show that numerical reasoning is amenable to automatic data generation, and thus one can inject this skill into pre-trained LMs, by generating large amounts of data, and training in a multi-task setup. We show that pre-training our model, GenBERT, on this data, dramatically improves performance on DROP (49.3 –> 72.3 F1), reaching performance that matches state-of-the-art models of comparable size, while using a simple and general-purpose encoder-decoder architecture. Moreover, GenBERT generalizes well to math word problem datasets, while maintaining high performance on standard RC tasks. Our approach provides a general recipe for injecting skills into large pre-trained LMs, whenever the skill is amenable to automatic data augmentation.

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Break It Down: A Question Understanding Benchmark
Tomer Wolfson | Mor Geva | Ankit Gupta | Matt Gardner | Yoav Goldberg | Daniel Deutch | Jonathan Berant
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 8

Understanding natural language questions entails the ability to break down a question into the requisite steps for computing its answer. In this work, we introduce a Question Decomposition Meaning Representation (QDMR) for questions. QDMR constitutes the ordered list of steps, expressed through natural language, that are necessary for answering a question. We develop a crowdsourcing pipeline, showing that quality QDMRs can be annotated at scale, and release the Break dataset, containing over 83K pairs of questions and their QDMRs. We demonstrate the utility of QDMR by showing that (a) it can be used to improve open-domain question answering on the HotpotQA dataset, (b) it can be deterministically converted to a pseudo-SQL formal language, which can alleviate annotation in semantic parsing applications. Last, we use Break to train a sequence-to-sequence model with copying that parses questions into QDMR structures, and show that it substantially outperforms several natural baselines.

2019

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Are We Modeling the Task or the Annotator? An Investigation of Annotator Bias in Natural Language Understanding Datasets
Mor Geva | Yoav Goldberg | Jonathan Berant
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing and the 9th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing (EMNLP-IJCNLP)

Crowdsourcing has been the prevalent paradigm for creating natural language understanding datasets in recent years. A common crowdsourcing practice is to recruit a small number of high-quality workers, and have them massively generate examples. Having only a few workers generate the majority of examples raises concerns about data diversity, especially when workers freely generate sentences. In this paper, we perform a series of experiments showing these concerns are evident in three recent NLP datasets. We show that model performance improves when training with annotator identifiers as features, and that models are able to recognize the most productive annotators. Moreover, we show that often models do not generalize well to examples from annotators that did not contribute to the training set. Our findings suggest that annotator bias should be monitored during dataset creation, and that test set annotators should be disjoint from training set annotators.

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DiscoFuse: A Large-Scale Dataset for Discourse-Based Sentence Fusion
Mor Geva | Eric Malmi | Idan Szpektor | Jonathan Berant
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long and Short Papers)

Sentence fusion is the task of joining several independent sentences into a single coherent text. Current datasets for sentence fusion are small and insufficient for training modern neural models. In this paper, we propose a method for automatically-generating fusion examples from raw text and present DiscoFuse, a large scale dataset for discourse-based sentence fusion. We author a set of rules for identifying a diverse set of discourse phenomena in raw text, and decomposing the text into two independent sentences. We apply our approach on two document collections: Wikipedia and Sports articles, yielding 60 million fusion examples annotated with discourse information required to reconstruct the fused text. We develop a sequence-to-sequence model on DiscoFuse and thoroughly analyze its strengths and weaknesses with respect to the various discourse phenomena, using both automatic as well as human evaluation. Finally, we conduct transfer learning experiments with WebSplit, a recent dataset for text simplification. We show that pretraining on DiscoFuse substantially improves performance on WebSplit when viewed as a sentence fusion task.

2018

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Learning to Search in Long Documents Using Document Structure
Mor Geva | Jonathan Berant
Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Reading comprehension models are based on recurrent neural networks that sequentially process the document tokens. As interest turns to answering more complex questions over longer documents, sequential reading of large portions of text becomes a substantial bottleneck. Inspired by how humans use document structure, we propose a novel framework for reading comprehension. We represent documents as trees, and model an agent that learns to interleave quick navigation through the document tree with more expensive answer extraction. To encourage exploration of the document tree, we propose a new algorithm, based on Deep Q-Network (DQN), which strategically samples tree nodes at training time. Empirically we find our algorithm improves question answering performance compared to DQN and a strong information-retrieval (IR) baseline, and that ensembling our model with the IR baseline results in further gains in performance.

2017

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Evaluating Semantic Parsing against a Simple Web-based Question Answering Model
Alon Talmor | Mor Geva | Jonathan Berant
Proceedings of the 6th Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics (*SEM 2017)

Semantic parsing shines at analyzing complex natural language that involves composition and computation over multiple pieces of evidence. However, datasets for semantic parsing contain many factoid questions that can be answered from a single web document. In this paper, we propose to evaluate semantic parsing-based question answering models by comparing them to a question answering baseline that queries the web and extracts the answer only from web snippets, without access to the target knowledge-base. We investigate this approach on COMPLEXQUESTIONS, a dataset designed to focus on compositional language, and find that our model obtains reasonable performance (∼35 F1 compared to 41 F1 of state-of-the-art). We find in our analysis that our model performs well on complex questions involving conjunctions, but struggles on questions that involve relation composition and superlatives.