Masaki Murata


2020

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Relation between Degree of Empathy for Narrative Speech and Type of Responsive Utterance in Attentive Listening
Koichiro Ito | Masaki Murata | Tomohiro Ohno | Shigeki Matsubara
Proceedings of the 12th Language Resources and Evaluation Conference

Nowadays, spoken dialogue agents such as communication robots and smart speakers listen to narratives of humans. In order for such an agent to be recognized as a listener of narratives and convey the attitude of attentive listening, it is necessary to generate responsive utterances. Moreover, responsive utterances can express empathy to narratives and showing an appropriate degree of empathy to narratives is significant for enhancing speaker’s motivation. The degree of empathy shown by responsive utterances is thought to depend on their type. However, the relation between responsive utterances and degrees of the empathy has not been explored yet. This paper describes the classification of responsive utterances based on the degree of empathy in order to explain that relation. In this research, responsive utterances are classified into five levels based on the effect of utterances and literature on attentive listening. Quantitative evaluations using 37,995 responsive utterances showed the appropriateness of the proposed classification.

2016

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Retrieval Term Prediction Using Deep Learning Methods
Qing Ma | Ibuki Tanigawa | Masaki Murata
Proceedings of the 30th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation: Posters

2014

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Automatic Detection and Analysis of Impressive Japanese Sentences Using Supervised Machine Learning
Daiki Hazure | Masaki Murata | Masato Tokuhisa
Proceedings of the First AHA!-Workshop on Information Discovery in Text

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Retrieval Term Prediction Using Deep Belief Networks
Qing Ma | Ibuki Tanigawa | Masaki Murata
Proceedings of the 28th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computing

2011

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System for Flexibly Judging the Misuse of Honorifics in Japanese
Tamotsu Shirado | Satoko Marumoto | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the 25th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

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Extraction of Broad-Scale, High-Precision Japanese-English Parallel Translation Expressions Using Lexical Information and Rules
Qing Ma | Shinya Sakagami | Masaki Murata
Proceedings of the 25th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

2010

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Detection of Users Suspected of Pretending to Be Other Users in a Community Site by Using Messages Submitted to Non-Target Categories
Naoki Ishikawa | Ryo Nishimura | Yasuhiko Watanabe | Masaki Murata | Yoshihiro Okada
Proceedings of the 24th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

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Using Various Features in Machine Learning to Obtain High Levels of Performance for Recognition of Japanese Notational Variants
Masahiro Kojima | Masaki Murata | Jun’ichi Kazama | Kow Kuroda | Atsushi Fujita | Eiji Aramaki | Masaaki Tsuchida | Yasuhiko Watanabe | Kentaro Torisawa
Proceedings of the 24th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

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Generation of Summaries that Appropriately and Adequately Express the Contents of Original Documents Using Word-Association Knowledge
Kazuki Takigawa | Masaki Murata | Masaaki Tsuchida | Stijn De Saeger | Kazuhide Yamamoto | Kentaro Torisawa
Proceedings of the 24th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

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A Bayesian Method for Robust Estimation of Distributional Similarities
Jun’ichi Kazama | Stijn De Saeger | Kow Kuroda | Masaki Murata | Kentaro Torisawa
Proceedings of the 48th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

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Construction of Chunk-Aligned Bilingual Lecture Corpus for Simultaneous Machine Translation
Masaki Murata | Tomohiro Ohno | Shigeki Matsubara | Yasuyoshi Inagaki
Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'10)

With the development of speech and language processing, speech translation systems have been developed. These studies target spoken dialogues, and employ consecutive interpretation, which uses a sentence as the translation unit. On the other hand, there exist a few researches about simultaneous interpreting, and recently, the language resources for promoting simultaneous interpreting research, such as the publication of an analytical large-scale corpus, has been prepared. For the future, it is necessary to make the corpora more practical toward realization of a simultaneous interpreting system. In this paper, we describe the construction of a bilingual corpus which can be used for simultaneous lecture interpreting research. Simultaneous lecture interpreting systems are required to recognize translation units in the middle of a sentence, and generate its translation at the proper timing. We constructed the bilingual lecture corpus by the following steps. First, we segmented sentences in the lecture data into semantically meaningful units for the simultaneous interpreting. And then, we assigned the translations to these units from the viewpoint of the simultaneous interpreting. In addition, we investigated the possibility of automatically detecting the simultaneous interpreting timing from our corpus.

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Detection of submitters suspected of pretending to be someone else in a community site
Naoki Ishikawa | Ryo Nishimura | Yasuhiko Watanabe | Yoshihiro Okada | Masaki Murata
Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'10)

One of the essential factors in community sites is anonymous submission. This is because anonymity gives users chances to submit messages (questions, problems, answers, opinions, etc.) without regard to shame and reputation. However, some users abuse the anonymity and disrupt communications in a community site. These users and their submissions discourage other users, keep them from retrieving good communication records, and decrease the credibility of the communication site. To solve this problem, we conducted an experimental study to detect submitters suspected of pretending to be someone else to manipulate communications in a community site by using machine learning techniques. In this study, we used messages in the data of Yahoo! chiebukuro for data training and examination.

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Automatic Comma Insertion for Japanese Text Generation
Masaki Murata | Tomohiro Ohno | Shigeki Matsubara
Proceedings of the 2010 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

2009

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Hypernym Discovery Based on Distributional Similarity and Hierarchical Structures
Ichiro Yamada | Kentaro Torisawa | Jun’ichi Kazama | Kow Kuroda | Masaki Murata | Stijn De Saeger | Francis Bond | Asuka Sumida
Proceedings of the 2009 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Large-Scale Verb Entailment Acquisition from the Web
Chikara Hashimoto | Kentaro Torisawa | Kow Kuroda | Stijn De Saeger | Masaki Murata | Jun’ichi Kazama
Proceedings of the 2009 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

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Linefeed Insertion into Japanese Spoken Monologue for Captioning
Tomohiro Ohno | Masaki Murata | Shigeki Matsubara
Proceedings of the Joint Conference of the 47th Annual Meeting of the ACL and the 4th International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing of the AFNLP

2008

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Selection of Japanese-English Equivalents by Integrating High-quality Corpora and Huge Amounts of Web Data
Qing Ma | Koichi Nakao | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'08)

As a first step to developing systems that enable non-native speakers to output near-perfect English sentences for given mixed English-Japanese sentences, we propose new approaches for selecting English equivalents by using the number of hits for various contexts in large English corpora. As the large English corpora, we not only used the huge amounts of Web data but also the manually compiled large, high-quality English corpora. Using high-quality corpora enables us to accurately select equivalents, and using huge amounts of Web data enables us to resolve the problem of the shortage of hits that normally occurs when using only high-quality corpora. The types and lengths of contexts used to select equivalents are variable and optimally determined according to the number of hits in the corpora, so that performance can be further refined. Computer experiments showed that the precision of our methods was much higher than that of the existing methods for equivalent selection.

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Non-Factoid Japanese Question Answering through Passage Retrieval that Is Weighted Based on Types of Answers
Masaki Murata | Sachiyo Tsukawaki | Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Qing Ma | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Third International Joint Conference on Natural Language Processing: Volume-II

2007

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Japanese Expressions that Include English Expressions
Masaki Murata | Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Koichiro Nakamoto | Katsunori Kotani | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the 21st Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

2006

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Machine-Learning-Based Transformation of Passive Japanese Sentences into Active by Separating Training Data into Each Input Particle
Masaki Murata | Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Tamotsu Shirado | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the COLING/ACL 2006 Main Conference Poster Sessions

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Creation of a Japanese Adverb Dictionary that Includes Information on the Speaker’s Communicative Intention Using Machine Learning
Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC’06)

Japanese adverbs are classified as either declarative or normal; the former declare the communicative intention of the speaker, while the latter convey a manner of action, a quantity, or a degree by which the adverb modifies the verb or adjective that it accompanies. We have automatically classified adverbs as either declarative or not declarative using a machine-learning method such as the maximum entropy method. We defined adverbs having positive or negative connotations as the positive data. We classified adverbs in the EDR dictionary and IPADIC used by Chasen using this result and built an adverb dictionary that contains descriptions of the communicative intentions of the speaker.

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Development of an Automatic Trend Exploration System using the MuST Data Collection
Masaki Murata | Koji Ichii | Qing Ma | Tamotsu Shirado | Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Sachiyo Tsukawaki | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Workshop on Information Extraction Beyond The Document

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Construction of Adverb Dictionary that Relates to Speaker Attitudes and Evaluation of Its Effectiveness
Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the 20th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

2005

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Information Retrieval Capable of Visualization and High Precision
Qing Ma | Kousuke Enomoto | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Companion Volume to the Proceedings of Conference including Posters/Demos and tutorial abstracts

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Trend Survey on Japanese Natural Language Processing Studies over the Last Decade
Masaki Murata | Koji Ichii | Qing Ma | Tamotsu Shirado | Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Hitoshi Isahara
Companion Volume to the Proceedings of Conference including Posters/Demos and tutorial abstracts

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Obtaining Japanese Lexical Units for Semantic Frames from Berkeley FrameNet Using a Bilingual Corpus
Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Masaki Murata | Kow Kuroda | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Linguistically Interpreted Corpora (LINC-2005)

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Semantic Role Labeling Using Support Vector Machines
Tomohiro Mitsumori | Masaki Murata | Yasushi Fukuda | Kouichi Doi | Hirohumi Doi
Proceedings of the Ninth Conference on Computational Natural Language Learning (CoNLL-2005)

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Analysis of Machine Translation Systems’ Errors in Tense, Aspect, and Modality
Masaki Murata | Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Qing Ma | Toshiyuki Kanamaru | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the 19th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

2004

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Three English Learner Assistance Systems Using Automatic Paraphrasing Techniques
Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the 18th Pacific Asia Conference on Language, Information and Computation

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Extraction of Hyperonymy of Adjectives from Large Corpora by Using the Neural Network Model
Kyoko Kanzaki | Qing Ma | Eiko Yamamoto | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC’04)

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Multilingual Aligned Parallel Treebank Corpus Reflecting Contextual Information and Its Applications
Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Yujie Zhang | Kiyoshi Sudo | Masaki Murata | Satoshi Sekine | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Workshop on Multilingual Linguistic Resources

2003

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Semantic Maps for Word Alignment in Bilingual Parallel Corpora
Qing Ma | Yujie Zhang | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Second SIGHAN Workshop on Chinese Language Processing

2002

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Classification of Adjectival and Non-adjectival Nouns Based on their Semantic Behavior by Using a Self-Organizing Semantic Map
Kyoko Kanzaki | Qing Ma | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
COLING-02: SEMANET: Building and Using Semantic Networks

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Automatic extraction of differences between spoken and written languages, and automatic translation from the written to the spoken language
Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC’02)

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Self-Organizing Chinese and Japanese Semantic Maps
Qing Ma | Min Zhang | Masaki Murata | Ming Zhou | Hitoshi Isahara
COLING 2002: The 19th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

2001

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Japanese Word Sense Disambiguation using the Simple Bayes and Support Vector Machine Methods
Masaki Murata | Masao Utiyama | Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Qing Ma | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of SENSEVAL-2 Second International Workshop on Evaluating Word Sense Disambiguation Systems

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Word Translation Based on Machine Learning Models Using Translation Memory and Corpora
Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Satoshi Sekine | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of SENSEVAL-2 Second International Workshop on Evaluating Word Sense Disambiguation Systems

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Using a Support-Vector Machine for Japanese-to-English Translation of Tense, Aspect, and Modality
Masaki Murata | Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Qing Ma | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the ACL 2001 Workshop on Data-Driven Methods in Machine Translation

2000

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Hybrid Neuro and Rule-Based Part of Speech Taggers
Qing Ma | Masaki Murata | Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Hitoshi Isahara
COLING 2000 Volume 1: The 18th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

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Bunsetsu Identification Using Category-Exclusive Rules
Masaki Murata | Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Qing Ma | Hitoshi Isahara
COLING 2000 Volume 1: The 18th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

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Word Order Acquisition from Corpora
Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Masaki Murata | Qing Ma | Satoshi Sekine | Hitoshi Isahara
COLING 2000 Volume 2: The 18th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

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A Statistical Approach to the Processing of Metonymy
Masao Utiyama | Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara
COLING 2000 Volume 2: The 18th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

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Dependency Model using Posterior Context
Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Masaki Murata | Satoshi Sekine | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Parsing Technologies

We describe a new model for dependency structure analysis. This model learns the relationship between two phrasal units called bunsetsus as three categories; ‘between’, ‘dependent’, and ‘beyond’, and estimates the dependency likelihood by considering not only the relationship between two bunsetsus but also the relationship between the left bunsetsu and all of the bunsetsus to its right. We implemented this model based on the maximum entropy model. When using the Kyoto University corpus, the dependency accuracy of our model was 88%, which is about 1% higher than that of the conventional model using exactly the same features.

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Named Entity Extraction Based on A Maximum Entropy Model and Transformation Rules
Kiyotaka Uchimoto | Qing Ma | Masaki Murata | Hiromi Ozaku | Hitoshi Isahara
Proceedings of the 38th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

1999

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Resolution of Indirect Anaphora in Japanese Sentences Using Examples: “X no Y (Y of X)”
Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara | Makoto Nagao
Coreference and Its Applications

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Pronoun Resolution in Japanese Sentences Using Surface Expressions and Examples
Masaki Murata | Hitoshi Isahara | Makoto Nagao
Coreference and Its Applications

1998

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An Estimate of Referent of Noun Phrases in Japanese Sentences
Masaki Murata | Makoto Nagao
COLING 1998 Volume 2: The 17th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

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An Estimate of Referent of Noun Phrases in Japanese Sentences
Masaki Murata | Makoto Nagao
36th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics and 17th International Conference on Computational Linguistics, Volume 2

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Construction of Japanese Nominal Semantic Dictionary using “A NO B” Phrases in Corpora
Sadao Kurohashi | Masaki Murata | Yasunori Yata | Mitsunobu Shimada | Makoto Nagao
The Computational Treatment of Nominals

1996

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Document Classification Using Domain Specific Kanji Characters Extracted by X2 Method
Yasuhiko Watanabe | Masaki Murata | Masahito Takeuchi | Makoto Nagao
COLING 1996 Volume 2: The 16th International Conference on Computational Linguistics