Juri Opitz


2020

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AMR Similarity Metrics from Principles
Juri Opitz | Letitia Parcalabescu | Anette Frank
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 8

Different metrics have been proposed to compare Abstract Meaning Representation (AMR) graphs. The canonical Smatch metric (Cai and Knight, 2013) aligns the variables of two graphs and assesses triple matches. The recent SemBleu metric (Song and Gildea, 2019) is based on the machine-translation metric Bleu (Papineni et al., 2002) and increases computational efficiency by ablating the variable-alignment. In this paper, i) we establish criteria that enable researchers to perform a principled assessment of metrics comparing meaning representations like AMR; ii) we undertake a thorough analysis of Smatch and SemBleu where we show that the latter exhibits some undesirable properties. For example, it does not conform to the identity of indiscernibles rule and introduces biases that are hard to control; and iii) we propose a novel metric S2 match that is more benevolent to only very slight meaning deviations and targets the fulfilment of all established criteria. We assess its suitability and show its advantages over Smatch and SemBleu.

2019

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Dissecting Content and Context in Argumentative Relation Analysis
Juri Opitz | Anette Frank
Proceedings of the 6th Workshop on Argument Mining

When assessing relations between argumentative units (e.g., support or attack), computational systems often exploit disclosing indicators or markers that are not part of elementary argumentative units (EAUs) themselves, but are gained from their context (position in paragraph, preceding tokens, etc.). We show that this dependency is much stronger than previously assumed. In fact, we show that by completely masking the EAU text spans and only feeding information from their context, a competitive system may function even better. We argue that an argument analysis system that relies more on discourse context than the argument’s content is unsafe, since it can easily be tricked. To alleviate this issue, we separate argumentative units from their context such that the system is forced to model and rely on an EAU’s content. We show that the resulting classification system is more robust, and argue that such models are better suited for predicting argumentative relations across documents.

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Automatic Accuracy Prediction for AMR Parsing
Juri Opitz | Anette Frank
Proceedings of the Eighth Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics (*SEM 2019)

Abstract Meaning Representation (AMR) represents sentences as directed, acyclic and rooted graphs, aiming at capturing their meaning in a machine readable format. AMR parsing converts natural language sentences into such graphs. However, evaluating a parser on new data by means of comparison to manually created AMR graphs is very costly. Also, we would like to be able to detect parses of questionable quality, or preferring results of alternative systems by selecting the ones for which we can assess good quality. We propose AMR accuracy prediction as the task of predicting several metrics of correctness for an automatically generated AMR parse – in absence of the corresponding gold parse. We develop a neural end-to-end multi-output regression model and perform three case studies: firstly, we evaluate the model’s capacity of predicting AMR parse accuracies and test whether it can reliably assign high scores to gold parses. Secondly, we perform parse selection based on predicted parse accuracies of candidate parses from alternative systems, with the aim of improving overall results. Finally, we predict system ranks for submissions from two AMR shared tasks on the basis of their predicted parse accuracy averages. All experiments are carried out across two different domains and show that our method is effective.

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An Argument-Marker Model for Syntax-Agnostic Proto-Role Labeling
Juri Opitz | Anette Frank
Proceedings of the Eighth Joint Conference on Lexical and Computational Semantics (*SEM 2019)

Semantic proto-role labeling (SPRL) is an alternative to semantic role labeling (SRL) that moves beyond a categorical definition of roles, following Dowty’s feature-based view of proto-roles. This theory determines agenthood vs. patienthood based on a participant’s instantiation of more or less typical agent vs. patient properties, such as, for example, volition in an event. To perform SPRL, we develop an ensemble of hierarchical models with self-attention and concurrently learned predicate-argument markers. Our method is competitive with the state-of-the art, overall outperforming previous work in two formulations of the task (multi-label and multi-variate Likert scale pre- diction). In contrast to previous work, our results do not depend on gold argument heads derived from supplementary gold tree banks.

2018

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Addressing the Winograd Schema Challenge as a Sequence Ranking Task
Juri Opitz | Anette Frank
Proceedings of the First International Workshop on Language Cognition and Computational Models

The Winograd Schema Challenge targets pronominal anaphora resolution problems which require the application of cognitive inference in combination with world knowledge. These problems are easy to solve for humans but most difficult to solve for machines. Computational models that previously addressed this task rely on syntactic preprocessing and incorporation of external knowledge by manually crafted features. We address the Winograd Schema Challenge from a new perspective as a sequence ranking task, and design a Siamese neural sequence ranking model which performs significantly better than a random baseline, even when solely trained on sequences of words. We evaluate against a baseline and a state-of-the-art system on two data sets and show that anonymization of noun phrase candidates strongly helps our model to generalize.

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Induction of a Large-Scale Knowledge Graph from the Regesta Imperii
Juri Opitz | Leo Born | Vivi Nastase
Proceedings of the Second Joint SIGHUM Workshop on Computational Linguistics for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, Humanities and Literature

We induce and visualize a Knowledge Graph over the Regesta Imperii (RI), an important large-scale resource for medieval history research. The RI comprise more than 150,000 digitized abstracts of medieval charters issued by the Roman-German kings and popes distributed over many European locations and a time span of more than 700 years. Our goal is to provide a resource for historians to visualize and query the RI, possibly aiding medieval history research. The resulting medieval graph and visualization tools are shared publicly.

2017

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A Mention-Ranking Model for Abstract Anaphora Resolution
Ana Marasović | Leo Born | Juri Opitz | Anette Frank
Proceedings of the 2017 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

Resolving abstract anaphora is an important, but difficult task for text understanding. Yet, with recent advances in representation learning this task becomes a more tangible aim. A central property of abstract anaphora is that it establishes a relation between the anaphor embedded in the anaphoric sentence and its (typically non-nominal) antecedent. We propose a mention-ranking model that learns how abstract anaphors relate to their antecedents with an LSTM-Siamese Net. We overcome the lack of training data by generating artificial anaphoric sentence–antecedent pairs. Our model outperforms state-of-the-art results on shell noun resolution. We also report first benchmark results on an abstract anaphora subset of the ARRAU corpus. This corpus presents a greater challenge due to a mixture of nominal and pronominal anaphors and a greater range of confounders. We found model variants that outperform the baselines for nominal anaphors, without training on individual anaphor data, but still lag behind for pronominal anaphors. Our model selects syntactically plausible candidates and – if disregarding syntax – discriminates candidates using deeper features.

2016

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Using Linear Classifiers for the Automatic Triage of Posts in the 2016 CLPsych Shared Task
Juri Opitz
Proceedings of the Third Workshop on Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology

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Deriving Players & Themes in the Regesta Imperii using SVMs and Neural Networks
Juri Opitz | Anette Frank
Proceedings of the 10th SIGHUM Workshop on Language Technology for Cultural Heritage, Social Sciences, and Humanities