Jimeng Sun


2019

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Clinical Concept Extraction for Document-Level Coding
Sarah Wiegreffe | Edward Choi | Sherry Yan | Jimeng Sun | Jacob Eisenstein
Proceedings of the 18th BioNLP Workshop and Shared Task

The text of clinical notes can be a valuable source of patient information and clinical assessments. Historically, the primary approach for exploiting clinical notes has been information extraction: linking spans of text to concepts in a detailed domain ontology. However, recent work has demonstrated the potential of supervised machine learning to extract document-level codes directly from the raw text of clinical notes. We propose to bridge the gap between the two approaches with two novel syntheses: (1) treating extracted concepts as features, which are used to supplement or replace the text of the note; (2) treating extracted concepts as labels, which are used to learn a better representation of the text. Unfortunately, the resulting concepts do not yield performance gains on the document-level clinical coding task. We explore possible explanations and future research directions.

2018

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Explainable Prediction of Medical Codes from Clinical Text
James Mullenbach | Sarah Wiegreffe | Jon Duke | Jimeng Sun | Jacob Eisenstein
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long Papers)

Clinical notes are text documents that are created by clinicians for each patient encounter. They are typically accompanied by medical codes, which describe the diagnosis and treatment. Annotating these codes is labor intensive and error prone; furthermore, the connection between the codes and the text is not annotated, obscuring the reasons and details behind specific diagnoses and treatments. We present an attentional convolutional network that predicts medical codes from clinical text. Our method aggregates information across the document using a convolutional neural network, and uses an attention mechanism to select the most relevant segments for each of the thousands of possible codes. The method is accurate, achieving precision@8 of 0.71 and a Micro-F1 of 0.54, which are both better than the prior state of the art. Furthermore, through an interpretability evaluation by a physician, we show that the attention mechanism identifies meaningful explanations for each code assignment.