Jiahai Wang


2020

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LogicalFactChecker: Leveraging Logical Operations for Fact Checking with Graph Module Network
Wanjun Zhong | Duyu Tang | Zhangyin Feng | Nan Duan | Ming Zhou | Ming Gong | Linjun Shou | Daxin Jiang | Jiahai Wang | Jian Yin
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Verifying the correctness of a textual statement requires not only semantic reasoning about the meaning of words, but also symbolic reasoning about logical operations like count, superlative, aggregation, etc. In this work, we propose LogicalFactChecker, a neural network approach capable of leveraging logical operations for fact checking. It achieves the state-of-the-art performance on TABFACT, a large-scale, benchmark dataset built for verifying a textual statement with semi-structured tables. This is achieved by a graph module network built upon the Transformer-based architecture. With a textual statement and a table as the input, LogicalFactChecker automatically derives a program (a.k.a. logical form) of the statement in a semantic parsing manner. A heterogeneous graph is then constructed to capture not only the structures of the table and the program, but also the connections between inputs with different modalities. Such a graph reveals the related contexts of each word in the statement, the table and the program. The graph is used to obtain graph-enhanced contextual representations of words in Transformer-based architecture. After that, a program-driven module network is further introduced to exploit the hierarchical structure of the program, where semantic compositionality is dynamically modeled along the program structure with a set of function-specific modules. Ablation experiments suggest that both the heterogeneous graph and the module network are important to obtain strong results.

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Reasoning Over Semantic-Level Graph for Fact Checking
Wanjun Zhong | Jingjing Xu | Duyu Tang | Zenan Xu | Nan Duan | Ming Zhou | Jiahai Wang | Jian Yin
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

Fact checking is a challenging task because verifying the truthfulness of a claim requires reasoning about multiple retrievable evidence. In this work, we present a method suitable for reasoning about the semantic-level structure of evidence. Unlike most previous works, which typically represent evidence sentences with either string concatenation or fusing the features of isolated evidence sentences, our approach operates on rich semantic structures of evidence obtained by semantic role labeling. We propose two mechanisms to exploit the structure of evidence while leveraging the advances of pre-trained models like BERT, GPT or XLNet. Specifically, using XLNet as the backbone, we first utilize the graph structure to re-define the relative distances of words, with the intuition that semantically related words should have short distances. Then, we adopt graph convolutional network and graph attention network to propagate and aggregate information from neighboring nodes on the graph. We evaluate our system on FEVER, a benchmark dataset for fact checking, and find that rich structural information is helpful and both our graph-based mechanisms improve the accuracy. Our model is the state-of-the-art system in terms of both official evaluation metrics, namely claim verification accuracy and FEVER score.

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Multi-choice Relational Reasoning for Machine Reading Comprehension
Wuya Chen | Xiaojun Quan | Chunyu Kit | Zhengcheng Min | Jiahai Wang
Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

This paper presents our study of cloze-style reading comprehension by imitating human reading comprehension, which normally involves tactical comparing and reasoning over candidates while choosing the best answer. We propose a multi-choice relational reasoning (McR2) model with an aim to enable relational reasoning on candidates based on fusion representations of document, query and candidates. For the fusion representations, we develop an efficient encoding architecture by integrating the schemes of bidirectional attention flow, self-attention and document-gated query reading. Then, comparing and inferring over candidates are executed by a novel relational reasoning network. We conduct extensive experiments on four datasets derived from two public corpora, Children’s Book Test and Who DiD What, to verify the validity and advantages of our model. The results show that it outperforms all baseline models significantly on the four benchmark datasets. The effectiveness of its key components is also validated by an ablation study.

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Neural Deepfake Detection with Factual Structure of Text
Wanjun Zhong | Duyu Tang | Zenan Xu | Ruize Wang | Nan Duan | Ming Zhou | Jiahai Wang | Jian Yin
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Deepfake detection, the task of automatically discriminating machine-generated text, is increasingly critical with recent advances in natural language generative models. Existing approaches to deepfake detection typically represent documents with coarse-grained representations. However, they struggle to capture factual structures of documents, which is a discriminative factor between machine-generated and human-written text according to our statistical analysis. To address this, we propose a graph-based model that utilizes the factual structure of a document for deepfake detection of text. Our approach represents the factual structure of a given document as an entity graph, which is further utilized to learn sentence representations with a graph neural network. Sentence representations are then composed to a document representation for making predictions, where consistent relations between neighboring sentences are sequentially modeled. Results of experiments on two public deepfake datasets show that our approach significantly improves strong base models built with RoBERTa. Model analysis further indicates that our model can distinguish the difference in the factual structure between machine-generated text and human-written text.