Janarthanan Rajendran


2020

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Quantifying the Effects of COVID-19 on Mental Health Support Forums
Laura Biester | Katie Matton | Janarthanan Rajendran | Emily Mower Provost | Rada Mihalcea
Proceedings of the 1st Workshop on NLP for COVID-19 (Part 2) at EMNLP 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic, like many of the disease outbreaks that have preceded it, is likely to have a profound effect on mental health. Understanding its impact can inform strategies for mitigating negative consequences. In this work, we seek to better understand the effects of COVID-19 on mental health by examining discussions within mental health support communities on Reddit. First, we quantify the rate at which COVID-19 is discussed in each community, or subreddit, in order to understand levels of pandemic-related discussion. Next, we examine the volume of activity in order to determine whether the number of people discussing mental health has risen. Finally, we analyze how COVID-19 has influenced language use and topics of discussion within each subreddit.

2019

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Learning End-to-End Goal-Oriented Dialog with Maximal User Task Success and Minimal Human Agent Use
Janarthanan Rajendran | Jatin Ganhotra | Lazaros C. Polymenakos
Transactions of the Association for Computational Linguistics, Volume 7

Neural end-to-end goal-oriented dialog systems showed promise to reduce the workload of human agents for customer service, as well as reduce wait time for users. However, their inability to handle new user behavior at deployment has limited their usage in real world. In this work, we propose an end-to-end trainable method for neural goal-oriented dialog systems that handles new user behaviors at deployment by transferring the dialog to a human agent intelligently. The proposed method has three goals: 1) maximize user’s task success by transferring to human agents, 2) minimize the load on the human agents by transferring to them only when it is essential, and 3) learn online from the human agent’s responses to reduce human agents’ load further. We evaluate our proposed method on a modified-bAbI dialog task, which simulates the scenario of new user behaviors occurring at test time. Experimental results show that our proposed method is effective in achieving the desired goals.

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NE-Table: A Neural key-value table for Named Entities
Janarthanan Rajendran | Jatin Ganhotra | Xiaoxiao Guo | Mo Yu | Satinder Singh | Lazaros Polymenakos
Proceedings of the International Conference on Recent Advances in Natural Language Processing (RANLP 2019)

Many Natural Language Processing (NLP) tasks depend on using Named Entities (NEs) that are contained in texts and in external knowledge sources. While this is easy for humans, the present neural methods that rely on learned word embeddings may not perform well for these NLP tasks, especially in the presence of Out-Of-Vocabulary (OOV) or rare NEs. In this paper, we propose a solution for this problem, and present empirical evaluations on: a) a structured Question-Answering task, b) three related Goal-Oriented dialog tasks, and c) a Reading-Comprehension task, which show that the proposed method can be effective in dealing with both in-vocabulary and OOV NEs. We create extended versions of dialog bAbI tasks 1,2 and 4 and OOV versions of the CBT test set which are available at - https://github.com/IBM/ne-table-datasets/

2018

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Learning End-to-End Goal-Oriented Dialog with Multiple Answers
Janarthanan Rajendran | Jatin Ganhotra | Satinder Singh | Lazaros Polymenakos
Proceedings of the 2018 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing

In a dialog, there could be multiple valid next utterances at any point. The present end-to-end neural methods for dialog do not take this into account. They learn with the assumption that at any time there is only one correct next utterance. In this work, we focus on this problem in the goal-oriented dialog setting where there are different paths to reach a goal. We propose a new method, that uses a combination of supervised learning and reinforcement learning approaches to address this issue. We also propose a new and more effective testbed, permuted-bAbI dialog tasks, by introducing multiple valid next utterances to the original-bAbI dialog tasks, which allows evaluation of end-to-end goal-oriented dialog systems in a more realistic setting. We show that there is a significant drop in performance of existing end-to-end neural methods from 81.5% per-dialog accuracy on original-bAbI dialog tasks to 30.3% on permuted-bAbI dialog tasks. We also show that our proposed method improves the performance and achieves 47.3% per-dialog accuracy on permuted-bAbI dialog tasks. We also release permuted-bAbI dialog tasks, our proposed testbed, to the community for evaluating dialog systems in a goal-oriented setting.

2016

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Bridge Correlational Neural Networks for Multilingual Multimodal Representation Learning
Janarthanan Rajendran | Mitesh M. Khapra | Sarath Chandar | Balaraman Ravindran
Proceedings of the 2016 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies

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A Correlational Encoder Decoder Architecture for Pivot Based Sequence Generation
Amrita Saha | Mitesh M. Khapra | Sarath Chandar | Janarthanan Rajendran | Kyunghyun Cho
Proceedings of COLING 2016, the 26th International Conference on Computational Linguistics: Technical Papers

Interlingua based Machine Translation (MT) aims to encode multiple languages into a common linguistic representation and then decode sentences in multiple target languages from this representation. In this work we explore this idea in the context of neural encoder decoder architectures, albeit on a smaller scale and without MT as the end goal. Specifically, we consider the case of three languages or modalities X, Z and Y wherein we are interested in generating sequences in Y starting from information available in X. However, there is no parallel training data available between X and Y but, training data is available between X & Z and Z & Y (as is often the case in many real world applications). Z thus acts as a pivot/bridge. An obvious solution, which is perhaps less elegant but works very well in practice is to train a two stage model which first converts from X to Z and then from Z to Y. Instead we explore an interlingua inspired solution which jointly learns to do the following (i) encode X and Z to a common representation and (ii) decode Y from this common representation. We evaluate our model on two tasks: (i) bridge transliteration and (ii) bridge captioning. We report promising results in both these applications and believe that this is a right step towards truly interlingua inspired encoder decoder architectures.