Hali Lindsay


2019

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The importance of sharing patient-generated clinical speech and language data
Kathleen C. Fraser | Nicklas Linz | Hali Lindsay | Alexandra König
Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology

Increased access to large datasets has driven progress in NLP. However, most computational studies of clinically-validated, patient-generated speech and language involve very few datapoints, as such data are difficult (and expensive) to collect. In this position paper, we argue that we must find ways to promote data sharing across research groups, in order to build datasets of a more appropriate size for NLP and machine learning analysis. We review the benefits and challenges of sharing clinical language data, and suggest several concrete actions by both clinical and NLP researchers to encourage multi-site and multi-disciplinary data sharing. We also propose the creation of a collaborative data sharing platform, to allow NLP researchers to take a more active responsibility for data transcription, annotation, and curation.

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Temporal Analysis of the Semantic Verbal Fluency Task in Persons with Subjective and Mild Cognitive Impairment
Nicklas Linz | Kristina Lundholm Fors | Hali Lindsay | Marie Eckerström | Jan Alexandersson | Dimitrios Kokkinakis
Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology

The Semantic Verbal Fluency (SVF) task is a classical neuropsychological assessment where persons are asked to produce words belonging to a semantic category (e.g., animals) in a given time. This paper introduces a novel method of temporal analysis for SVF tasks utilizing time intervals and applies it to a corpus of elderly Swedish subjects (mild cognitive impairment, subjective cognitive impairment and healthy controls). A general decline in word count and lexical frequency over the course of the task is revealed, as well as an increase in word transition times. Persons with subjective cognitive impairment had a higher word count during the last intervals, but produced words of the same lexical frequencies. Persons with MCI had a steeper decline in both word count and lexical frequencies during the third interval. Additional correlations with neuropsychological scores suggest these findings are linked to a person’s overall vocabulary size and processing speed, respectively. Classification results improved when adding the novel features (AUC=0.72), supporting their diagnostic value.

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Automatic Data-Driven Approaches for Evaluating the Phonemic Verbal Fluency Task with Healthy Adults
Hali Lindsay | Nicklas Linz | Johannes Troeger | Jan Alexandersson
Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Natural Language and Speech Processing