Geeticka Chauhan


2020

pdf bib
Proceedings of Second Workshop for NLP Open Source Software (NLP-OSS)
Eunjeong L. Park | Masato Hagiwara | Dmitrijs Milajevs | Nelson F. Liu | Geeticka Chauhan | Liling Tan
Proceedings of Second Workshop for NLP Open Source Software (NLP-OSS)

2019

bib
A Framework for Relation Extraction Across Multiple Datasets in Multiple Domains
Geeticka Chauhan | Matthew McDermott | Peter Szolovits
Proceedings of the 2019 Workshop on Widening NLP

In this work, we aim to build a unifying framework for relation extraction (RE), applying this on 3 highly used datasets with the ability to be extendable to new datasets. At the moment, the domain suffers from lack of reproducibility as well as a lack of consensus on generalizable techniques. Our framework will be open-sourced and will aid in performing systematic exploration on the effect of different modeling techniques, pre-processing, training methodologies and evaluation metrics on the 3 datasets to help establish a consensus.

pdf bib
REflex: Flexible Framework for Relation Extraction in Multiple Domains
Geeticka Chauhan | Matthew B.A. McDermott | Peter Szolovits
Proceedings of the 18th BioNLP Workshop and Shared Task

Systematic comparison of methods for relation extraction (RE) is difficult because many experiments in the field are not described precisely enough to be completely reproducible and many papers fail to report ablation studies that would highlight the relative contributions of their various combined techniques. In this work, we build a unifying framework for RE, applying this on three highly used datasets (from the general, biomedical and clinical domains) with the ability to be extendable to new datasets. By performing a systematic exploration of modeling, pre-processing and training methodologies, we find that choices of preprocessing are a large contributor performance and that omission of such information can further hinder fair comparison. Other insights from our exploration allow us to provide recommendations for future research in this area.

2018

pdf bib
MIT-MEDG at SemEval-2018 Task 7: Semantic Relation Classification via Convolution Neural Network
Di Jin | Franck Dernoncourt | Elena Sergeeva | Matthew McDermott | Geeticka Chauhan
Proceedings of The 12th International Workshop on Semantic Evaluation

SemEval 2018 Task 7 tasked participants to build a system to classify two entities within a sentence into one of the 6 possible relation types. We tested 3 classes of models: Linear classifiers, Long Short-Term Memory (LSTM) models, and Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) models. Ultimately, the CNN model class proved most performant, so we specialized to this model for our final submissions. We improved performance beyond a vanilla CNN by including a variant of negative sampling, using custom word embeddings learned over a corpus of ACL articles, training over corpora of both tasks 1.1 and 1.2, using reversed feature, using part of context words beyond the entity pairs and using ensemble methods to improve our final predictions. We also tested attention based pooling, up-sampling, and data augmentation, but none improved performance. Our model achieved rank 6 out of 28 (macro-averaged F1-score: 72.7) in subtask 1.1, and rank 4 out of 20 (macro F1: 80.6) in subtask 1.2.

pdf bib
A New Approach to Animacy Detection
Labiba Jahan | Geeticka Chauhan | Mark Finlayson
Proceedings of the 27th International Conference on Computational Linguistics

Animacy is a necessary property for a referent to be an agent, and thus animacy detection is useful for a variety of natural language processing tasks, including word sense disambiguation, co-reference resolution, semantic role labeling, and others. Prior work treated animacy as a word-level property, and has developed statistical classifiers to classify words as either animate or inanimate. We discuss why this approach to the problem is ill-posed, and present a new approach based on classifying the animacy of co-reference chains. We show that simple voting approaches to inferring the animacy of a chain from its constituent words perform relatively poorly, and then present a hybrid system merging supervised machine learning (ML) and a small number of hand-built rules to compute the animacy of referring expressions and co-reference chains. This method achieves state of the art performance. The supervised ML component leverages features such as word embeddings over referring expressions, parts of speech, and grammatical and semantic roles. The rules take into consideration parts of speech and the hypernymy structure encoded in WordNet. The system achieves an F1 of 0.88 for classifying the animacy of referring expressions, which is comparable to state of the art results for classifying the animacy of words, and achieves an F1 of 0.75 for classifying the animacy of coreference chains themselves. We release our training and test dataset, which includes 142 texts (all narratives) comprising 156,154 words, 34,698 referring expressions, and 10,941 co-reference chains. We test the method on a subset of the OntoNotes dataset, showing using manual sampling that animacy classification is 90% +/- 2% accurate for coreference chains, and 92% +/- 1% for referring expressions. The data also contains 46 folktales, which present an interesting challenge because they often involve characters who are members of traditionally inanimate classes (e.g., stoves that walk, trees that talk). We show that our system is able to detect the animacy of these unusual referents with an F1 of 0.95.