Elsbeth Turcan


2020

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Subtitles to Segmentation: Improving Low-Resource Speech-to-TextTranslation Pipelines
David Wan | Zhengping Jiang | Chris Kedzie | Elsbeth Turcan | Peter Bell | Kathy McKeown
Proceedings of the workshop on Cross-Language Search and Summarization of Text and Speech (CLSSTS2020)

In this work, we focus on improving ASR output segmentation in the context of low-resource language speech-to-text translation. ASR output segmentation is crucial, as ASR systems segment the input audio using purely acoustic information and are not guaranteed to output sentence-like segments. Since most MT systems expect sentences as input, feeding in longer unsegmented passages can lead to sub-optimal performance. We explore the feasibility of using datasets of subtitles from TV shows and movies to train better ASR segmentation models. We further incorporate part-of-speech (POS) tag and dependency label information (derived from the unsegmented ASR outputs) into our segmentation model. We show that this noisy syntactic information can improve model accuracy. We evaluate our models intrinsically on segmentation quality and extrinsically on downstream MT performance, as well as downstream tasks including cross-lingual information retrieval (CLIR) tasks and human relevance assessments. Our model shows improved performance on downstream tasks for Lithuanian and Bulgarian.

2019

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Dreaddit: A Reddit Dataset for Stress Analysis in Social Media
Elsbeth Turcan | Kathy McKeown
Proceedings of the Tenth International Workshop on Health Text Mining and Information Analysis (LOUHI 2019)

Stress is a nigh-universal human experience, particularly in the online world. While stress can be a motivator, too much stress is associated with many negative health outcomes, making its identification useful across a range of domains. However, existing computational research typically only studies stress in domains such as speech, or in short genres such as Twitter. We present Dreaddit, a new text corpus of lengthy multi-domain social media data for the identification of stress. Our dataset consists of 190K posts from five different categories of Reddit communities; we additionally label 3.5K total segments taken from 3K posts using Amazon Mechanical Turk. We present preliminary supervised learning methods for identifying stress, both neural and traditional, and analyze the complexity and diversity of the data and characteristics of each category.