Dongwon Lee


2020

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Authorship Attribution for Neural Text Generation
Adaku Uchendu | Thai Le | Kai Shu | Dongwon Lee
Proceedings of the 2020 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

In recent years, the task of generating realistic short and long texts have made tremendous advancements. In particular, several recently proposed neural network-based language models have demonstrated their astonishing capabilities to generate texts that are challenging to distinguish from human-written texts with the naked eye. Despite many benefits and utilities of such neural methods, in some applications, being able to tell the “author” of a text in question becomes critically important. In this work, in the context of this Turing Test, we investigate the so-called authorship attribution problem in three versions: (1) given two texts T1 and T2, are both generated by the same method or not? (2) is the given text T written by a human or machine? (3) given a text T and k candidate neural methods, can we single out the method (among k alternatives) that generated T? Against one humanwritten and eight machine-generated texts (i.e., CTRL, GPT, GPT2, GROVER, XLM, XLNET, PPLM, FAIR), we empirically experiment with the performance of various models in three problems. By and large, we find that most generators still generate texts significantly different from human-written ones, thereby making three problems easier to solve. However, the qualities of texts generated by GPT2, GROVER, and FAIR are better, often confusing machine classifiers in solving three problems. All codes and datasets of our experiments are available at: https://bit.ly/ 302zWdz

2008

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The ACL Anthology Reference Corpus: A Reference Dataset for Bibliographic Research in Computational Linguistics
Steven Bird | Robert Dale | Bonnie Dorr | Bryan Gibson | Mark Joseph | Min-Yen Kan | Dongwon Lee | Brett Powley | Dragomir Radev | Yee Fan Tan
Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'08)

The ACL Anthology is a digital archive of conference and journal papers in natural language processing and computational linguistics. Its primary purpose is to serve as a reference repository of research results, but we believe that it can also be an object of study and a platform for research in its own right. We describe an enriched and standardized reference corpus derived from the ACL Anthology that can be used for research in scholarly document processing. This corpus, which we call the ACL Anthology Reference Corpus (ACL ARC), brings together the recent activities of a number of research groups around the world. Our goal is to make the corpus widely available, and to encourage other researchers to use it as a standard testbed for experiments in both bibliographic and bibliometric research.

2007

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PSNUS: Web People Name Disambiguation by Simple Clustering with Rich Features
Ergin Elmacioglu | Yee Fan Tan | Su Yan | Min-Yen Kan | Dongwon Lee
Proceedings of the Fourth International Workshop on Semantic Evaluations (SemEval-2007)