Anjali Narayan-Chen


2020

pdf bib
Learning to execute instructions in a Minecraft dialogue
Prashant Jayannavar | Anjali Narayan-Chen | Julia Hockenmaier
Proceedings of the 58th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

The Minecraft Collaborative Building Task is a two-player game in which an Architect (A) instructs a Builder (B) to construct a target structure in a simulated Blocks World Environment. We define the subtask of predicting correct action sequences (block placements and removals) in a given game context, and show that capturing B’s past actions as well as B’s perspective leads to a significant improvement in performance on this challenging language understanding problem.

pdf bib
Schema-Guided Natural Language Generation
Yuheng Du | Shereen Oraby | Vittorio Perera | Minmin Shen | Anjali Narayan-Chen | Tagyoung Chung | Anushree Venkatesh | Dilek Hakkani-Tur
Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Natural Language Generation

Neural network based approaches to data-to-text natural language generation (NLG) have gained popularity in recent years, with the goal of generating a natural language prompt that accurately realizes an input meaning representation. To facilitate the training of neural network models, researchers created large datasets of paired utterances and their meaning representations. However, the creation of such datasets is an arduous task and they mostly consist of simple meaning representations composed of slot and value tokens to be realized. These representations do not include any contextual information that an NLG system can use when trying to generalize, such as domain information and descriptions of slots and values. In this paper, we present the novel task of Schema-Guided Natural Language Generation (SG-NLG). Here, the goal is still to generate a natural language prompt, but in SG-NLG, the input MRs are paired with rich schemata providing contextual information. To generate a dataset for SG-NLG we re-purpose an existing dataset for another task: dialog state tracking, which includes a large and rich schema spanning multiple different attributes, including information about the domain, user intent, and slot descriptions. We train different state-of-the-art models for neural natural language generation on this dataset and show that in many cases, including rich schema information allows our models to produce higher quality outputs both in terms of semantics and diversity. We also conduct experiments comparing model performance on seen versus unseen domains, and present a human evaluation demonstrating high ratings for overall output quality.

2019

pdf bib
Collaborative Dialogue in Minecraft
Anjali Narayan-Chen | Prashant Jayannavar | Julia Hockenmaier
Proceedings of the 57th Annual Meeting of the Association for Computational Linguistics

We wish to develop interactive agents that can communicate with humans to collaboratively solve tasks in grounded scenarios. Since computer games allow us to simulate such tasks without the need for physical robots, we define a Minecraft-based collaborative building task in which one player (A, the Architect) is shown a target structure and needs to instruct the other player (B, the Builder) to build this structure. Both players interact via a chat interface. A can observe B but cannot place blocks. We present the Minecraft Dialogue Corpus, a collection of 509 conversations and game logs. As a first step towards our goal of developing fully interactive agents for this task, we consider the subtask of Architect utterance generation, and show how challenging it is.

2017

pdf bib
Towards Problem Solving Agents that Communicate and Learn
Anjali Narayan-Chen | Colin Graber | Mayukh Das | Md Rakibul Islam | Soham Dan | Sriraam Natarajan | Janardhan Rao Doppa | Julia Hockenmaier | Martha Palmer | Dan Roth
Proceedings of the First Workshop on Language Grounding for Robotics

Agents that communicate back and forth with humans to help them execute non-linguistic tasks are a long sought goal of AI. These agents need to translate between utterances and actionable meaning representations that can be interpreted by task-specific problem solvers in a context-dependent manner. They should also be able to learn such actionable interpretations for new predicates on the fly. We define an agent architecture for this scenario and present a series of experiments in the Blocks World domain that illustrate how our architecture supports language learning and problem solving in this domain.