Amanda Clare


2018

pdf bib
HarriGT: A Tool for Linking News to Science
James Ravenscroft | Amanda Clare | Maria Liakata
Proceedings of ACL 2018, System Demonstrations

Being able to reliably link scientific works to the newspaper articles that discuss them could provide a breakthrough in the way we rationalise and measure the impact of science on our society. Linking these articles is challenging because the language used in the two domains is very different, and the gathering of online resources to align the two is a substantial information retrieval endeavour. We present HarriGT, a semi-automated tool for building corpora of news articles linked to the scientific papers that they discuss. Our aim is to facilitate future development of information-retrieval tools for newspaper/scientific work citation linking. HarriGT retrieves newspaper articles from an archive containing 17 years of UK web content. It also integrates with 3 large external citation networks, leveraging named entity extraction, and document classification to surface relevant examples of scientific literature to the user. We also provide a tuned candidate ranking algorithm to highlight potential links between scientific papers and newspaper articles to the user, in order of likelihood. HarriGT is provided as an open source tool (http://harrigt.xyz).

2016

pdf bib
Applying Core Scientific Concepts to Context-Based Citation Recommendation
Daniel Duma | Maria Liakata | Amanda Clare | James Ravenscroft | Ewan Klein
Proceedings of the Tenth International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC'16)

The task of recommending relevant scientific literature for a draft academic paper has recently received significant interest. In our effort to ease the discovery of scientific literature and augment scientific writing, we aim to improve the relevance of results based on a shallow semantic analysis of the source document and the potential documents to recommend. We investigate the utility of automatic argumentative and rhetorical annotation of documents for this purpose. Specifically, we integrate automatic Core Scientific Concepts (CoreSC) classification into a prototype context-based citation recommendation system and investigate its usefulness to the task. We frame citation recommendation as an information retrieval task and we use the categories of the annotation schemes to apply different weights to the similarity formula. Our results show interesting and consistent correlations between the type of citation and the type of sentence containing the relevant information.