Alexandra König


2019

pdf bib
The importance of sharing patient-generated clinical speech and language data
Kathleen C. Fraser | Nicklas Linz | Hali Lindsay | Alexandra König
Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Computational Linguistics and Clinical Psychology

Increased access to large datasets has driven progress in NLP. However, most computational studies of clinically-validated, patient-generated speech and language involve very few datapoints, as such data are difficult (and expensive) to collect. In this position paper, we argue that we must find ways to promote data sharing across research groups, in order to build datasets of a more appropriate size for NLP and machine learning analysis. We review the benefits and challenges of sharing clinical language data, and suggest several concrete actions by both clinical and NLP researchers to encourage multi-site and multi-disciplinary data sharing. We also propose the creation of a collaborative data sharing platform, to allow NLP researchers to take a more active responsibility for data transcription, annotation, and curation.

pdf bib
Multilingual prediction of Alzheimer’s disease through domain adaptation and concept-based language modelling
Kathleen C. Fraser | Nicklas Linz | Bai Li | Kristina Lundholm Fors | Frank Rudzicz | Alexandra König | Jan Alexandersson | Philippe Robert | Dimitrios Kokkinakis
Proceedings of the 2019 Conference of the North American Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: Human Language Technologies, Volume 1 (Long and Short Papers)

There is growing evidence that changes in speech and language may be early markers of dementia, but much of the previous NLP work in this area has been limited by the size of the available datasets. Here, we compare several methods of domain adaptation to augment a small French dataset of picture descriptions (n = 57) with a much larger English dataset (n = 550), for the task of automatically distinguishing participants with dementia from controls. The first challenge is to identify a set of features that transfer across languages; in addition to previously used features based on information units, we introduce a new set of features to model the order in which information units are produced by dementia patients and controls. These concept-based language model features improve classification performance in both English and French separately, and the best result (AUC = 0.89) is achieved using the multilingual training set with a combination of information and language model features.

2017

pdf bib
Using Neural Word Embeddings in the Analysis of the Clinical Semantic Verbal Fluency Task
Nicklas Linz | Johannes Tröger | Jan Alexandersson | Alexandra König
IWCS 2017 — 12th International Conference on Computational Semantics — Short papers